Roof Verges Introduced to ENDUROCADD Software

Verges are roof features that extend over the edge of a gable or skillion roof. Verges are very popular with architects and homeowners, but they also present several challenges.

For example, since they cantilever over the edge of buildings, they are subject to large wind uplift forces and must be able to support people standing on the overhang with minimal deflection of the structure underneath. They also need to have fixing locations for fascia, and the ability to cantilever over both end of the building as well as the eaves.

Thankfully, the latest version of the ENDUROCADD® software comes with complete configuration-to-installation support for two types of verges: gable ladders and outriggers.

Let’s take a closer look! There are 2 options: gable ladders and outriggers.

Gable Ladders

Gable Ladders are built like wall panels, with bottom plates, top plates, noggings, studs and bracing. They are supported at vertical roof faces by offset raking walls that position the gable ladders in the same plane as roof trusses and allow them to be fixed to the boxed top chord of the end truss.

These are the roof features in which gable ladders can be used.

Outriggers

Outriggers sit on top of truss top chords above vertical roof faces. They can be supported by raking walls or trusses and are used to overhang a wide range of vertical roof faces including gable roofs, skillion roofs, and dutch hips.

These are the roof features in which outriggers can be used.

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Find out more about the benefits of the ENDUROCADD® software

The ENDUROCADD® software is rich in features to automate the design of light gauge steel buildings.

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